Florida Manatees On The Move In Sebastian, Vero Beach

November is manatee month in Sebastian and Vero Beach.
November is manatee month in Sebastian and Vero Beach.

SEBASTIAN, Florida – November is Manatee Awareness Month and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is reminding everyone that public stewardship on the water makes a difference in Sebastian and Vero Beach.

Manatees are now migrating to warmer waters as people are slowing down and looking out for these large aquatic mammals in waterways throughout Sebastian, Vero Beach, and other areas of Indian River County.

Florida is home to more than 6,600 manatees.

Many seasonal manatee protection zones go into effect Nov. 15. Though some signs identifying manatee zones may have been damaged by Hurricane Irma, information on manatee zone locations is also available online.

If you see damaged waterway signs, report them at MyFWC.com/Boating by clicking on “Waterway Management,” “Waterway Markers” and then “Damaged/Missing Waterway Markers.”

How can people keep making a difference for manatees?

  • Watch for these large aquatic mammals as they search for warmer waters to help them survive winter’s cold, which they generally find in freshwater springs and the outflow of power plants.
  • Wear polarized sunglasses to spot them moving, grazing and resting in the water. Keep a lookout for the circular “footprints” they leave on the surface of the water.
    Slow down when boating and follow posted manatee zones.
  • Observe manatees from a distance to limit disturbance.
  • Report injured, entangled, orphaned or dead manatees to the FWC’s Wildlife Alert Hotline: 888-404-FWCC (3922), #FWC or *FWC on your cell phone or text [email protected]
  • Continue to support the manatee decal and license plate, and tell everyone how the decal and license plate support the FWC’s manatee conservation efforts.

Earlier this year, the Florida manatee was reclassified from endangered to a threatened status, under the federal Endangered Species Act, in a decision announced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. While this is a notable step, there is still work to be done to ensure continued progress toward recovery of our official state marine mammal.

“People’s efforts to help Florida manatees are working. Let’s celebrate the fact that conservation actions are making a difference and manatees are no longer endangered by thanking all the individuals and organizations that contributed to this milestone,” said Carol Knox, who leads the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (FWC) Imperiled Species Management Section.

“It’s important though to remain vigilant,” Knox said. “Let’s keep up the efforts that are helping with manatee recovery.”

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About Andy Hodges
Andy Hodges grew up in Jupiter, Florida where he began his career in radio and TV broadcasting for over 12 years. He would make a career change to computer programming. Andy spent seven years working for tech companies in Atlanta before moving to Indian River County in 2002. He returned to the news sector in 2005 as a writer. Andy joined Sebastian Daily in 2016 as our editor in chief.