Sebastian Man Pleads Not Guilty to Murder Charge in Logan Spencer Case

Sebastian teenager Elisha Charles Martin, 18, admitted to dropping off Logan Spencer where police found his body in Fellsmere, Florida.
Sebastian teenager Elisha Charles Martin, 18, admitted to dropping off Logan Spencer where police found his body in Fellsmere, Florida.

SEBASTIAN – On Wednesday, Elisha Martin pleaded not guilty to murder charges in the death of Sebastian River High School student Logan Spencer.

In late February, Martin, 18, was arrested as a person of interest after Logan’s body was found in Fellsmere. Three days later, Martin was charged with 1st Degree Murder in the homicide.

Sheriff Deryl Loar called the murder of Spencer, 16, an execution-style killing after Martin lured his victim into the woods in Fellsmere.

Martin was originally charged with first-degree murder, but state prosecutors downgraded that charge on March 15, stating the killing may have demonstrated a “depraved mind regardless of human life,” but it was not premeditated.

Some experts would argue that it was premeditated after Martin picked up Logan and drove him to Fellsmere where he murdered him. Martin blamed Spencer for stealing money and had planned the killing as an act of revenge.

However, by Florida law, only a grand jury can formally file first-degree murder charges. Assistant State Attorney Chris Taylor could not say whether prosecutors are planning to convene a grand jury in Martin’s case.

In court filings, Martin also pleaded not guilty to a charge of possession with intent to sell cannabis over 20 grams. Detectives found over 40 grams of marijuana when they searched his house prior to his arrest. Martin also told investigators that he sells marijuana.

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About Andy Hodges
Andy Hodges grew up in Jupiter, Florida where he began his career in radio and TV broadcasting for over 12 years. He would make a career change to computer programming. Andy spent seven years working for tech companies in Atlanta before moving to Indian River County in 2002. He returned to the news sector in 2005 as a writer. Andy joined Sebastian Daily in 2016 as our editor in chief.