Tropical Depression 2 forms in Atlantic Ocean, but don’t fret

Tropical Depression Two advisory from National Hurricane Center.
Tropical Depression Two advisory from National Hurricane Center. (Photo: NHC)

SEBASTIAN, Florida – The National Hurricane Center is monitoring Tropical Storm Two, which formed Thursday morning in the Atlantic Ocean.

There is no indication the depression will form into a hurricane, much less strike Florida or Indian River County, according to forecasters.

“The system is expected to begin encountering strong westerly shear and also accelerate, both of which should cause it to degenerate into an open wave east of the Lesser Antilles,” a spokesman for the National Hurricane Center told Sebastian Daily.

A tropical depression is a low-pressure system with thunderstorms that produce maximum winds of about 39 miles per hour. Anything more than that is considered a tropical storm.

As of Thursday morning, the storm system was located between the Cabo Verde Islands and the Lesser Antilles, southeast of the Caribbean Sea.

“At 11:00 a.m., the center of Tropical Depression Two was located near latitude 10.2 North, longitude 41.4 West. The depression is moving toward the west near 16 mph. A fast westward to west northwestward motion is expected through the weekend,” the National Hurricane Center said.

The system is expected to deteriorate before moving closer to Peurto Rico in the coming days.

Subscribe to our Sebastian Newsletter to find out what's going on around Indian River County.

Copyright 2018 SebastianDaily.com All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

mm
About Andy Hodges
Andy Hodges grew up in Jupiter, Florida where he began his career in radio and TV broadcasting for over 12 years. He would make a career change to computer programming. Andy spent seven years working for tech companies in Atlanta before moving to Indian River County in 2002. He returned to the news sector in 2005 as a writer. Andy joined Sebastian Daily in 2016 as our editor in chief.